Aaron Hotfelder

J.D. · University of Missouri School of Law

Aaron Hotfelder is a legal editor at Nolo specializing in employment law and workers' compensation law. He has written for Nolo and Lawyers.com since 2011, covering topics ranging from workplace discrimination to unemployment benefits to employee privacy laws. He's a member of the National Employment Lawyers Association (NELA).    

Books and citations. Aaron has edited many Nolo titles, including The Manager's Legal Handbook, Dealing With Problem Employees, and Working With Independent Contractors, and is a co-author of The Employer's Legal Handbook. Aaron's work has been cited by U.S. News & World Report, TheStreet.com, the St. Louis University Law Journal, and the Minnesota Law Review, among many other outlets.

Early legal career. Before joining Nolo as a legal editor, Aaron worked at a small law firm in Columbia, Missouri, representing clients in Social Security disability, long-term disability, and workers’ compensation cases. He later spent three years serving as an employment law consultant for a human resources and benefits compliance firm.

Education. Aaron received his law degree in 2010 from the University of Missouri School of Law. He holds a B.S. in criminal justice from Truman State University, known by some as the "Harvard of Northeast Missouri." 


Articles By Aaron Hotfelder

Ohio Wrongful Termination Laws
Employees in Ohio work at will—meaning employers can fire them for any reason—but there are exceptions. If you've been fired for an illegal reason, you might have a valid claim for wrongful termination.
Virginia Wrongful Termination Laws
Employees in Virginia work at will—meaning employers can fire them for any reason—but there are exceptions. If you've been fired for an illegal reason, you might have a valid claim for wrongful termination.
Wrongful Termination Laws in Nebraska
Have you recently lost your job? If so, you might be wondering whether you have grounds for a wrongful termination lawsuit against your former employer. In Nebraska, as in other states, employees work at will. This means an employee can generally be fired at any time and for any reason, or for no reason at all.
Michigan Wrongful Termination Laws
Employees in Michigan work at will—meaning employers can fire them for any reason—but there are exceptions. If you've been fired for an illegal reason, you might have a valid claim for wrongful termination.
Maryland Wrongful Termination Laws
Learn if you've been fired illegally, whether you're protected under Maryland and federal labor laws, and what you can do about it.
North Carolina Wrongful Termination Laws
Learn if you've been fired illegally, whether you're protected under North Carolina and federal labor laws, and what you can do about it.
Oregon Wrongful Termination Laws
Learn if you've been fired illegally, whether you're protected under Oregon and federal labor laws, and what you can do about it.
Arizona Wrongful Termination Laws
Learn if you've been fired illegally, whether you're protected under Arizona and federal labor laws, and what you can do about it.
Illinois Wrongful Termination Laws
Employees in Illinois work at will—meaning employers can fire them for any reason—but there are exceptions. If you've been fired for an illegal reason, you might have a valid claim for wrongful termination.
New York Wrongful Termination Laws
Have you recently lost your job? If so, you might be wondering whether you have grounds for a wrongful termination lawsuit against your former employer. In New York, as in other states, employees work at will. This means an employee can generally be fired at any time and for any reason, or for no reason at all. But there are exceptions.